Marche Victoria Oriental

As a destination for the first lab of the course, we visited Marche Victoria Oriental, a grocery store with products from India, Bangladesh,  The Antilles and Sri Lanka. It was a rather difficult task as we were told by an employee that pictures were forbidden inside the place, however; the task needed to be done and we discreetly collected a few interesting products that particularly catched our attention.  

  1. Jowar Flour
    Among the millets group, Jowar is one of the most known grains of this kind of cereal/grain crops. Jowar, also known as Sorghum, is qualified as a hardy crop. One of the main attributions of this flour, is the fact that is gluten free. Its popularity comes from Indian households, from western and central parts of India. It’s use in the kitchen varies from creating  nourishing rotis (thanks to the large content of nutritional value), to the elaboration of poori(deep fried pastry snack), Muthias (Gujarati style dumplings), Thalipeeth (Maharashtrian spiced pancakes) and khakra (Guajarati snack).

2. Karela juice

27781321_992261207588515_2051780404_n.jpgKarela juice comes from the gourd plant, typically frown in South East Asia, India, East Africa and South America. Also known as bitter melon, of green color and with the shape of a cucumber, drinking Kerala juice has been a popular tradition in parts of India, thanks to the cultural belief of its health benefits as treating diabetes and cancer protection benefits.

 

 

 

3. Curry Leaves

27781502_1647231522023772_1651159869_n.jpgCurry leaves come from the curry tree, which is native to India and Sri Lanka, as well as categorized as a tropical tree. As many other spices, curry leaves are known to posses many medicinal properties according to Ayurvedic medicine, such as having antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammayory, anti-carciogenic and anti-diabetic properties. Its application in Indian cuisine is one of a kind, by havingmultiple different curry based dishes.

4. Bombay duck pickle
27783109_992261640921805_748780021_n.jpgBombay Duck is a fish that comes mostly off the coast of Bombay, now known as Mumbai. Its flavor is unique and therefore, it’s wide application in the Indian cuisine, that varies from flavorful curries, as well as a spread with wheat crackers or breads. Also, it is commonly used as a condiment for sandwiches spreads, instant noodles, pizza and dip for vegetables and chips. Its ingredients may contain onions, sugar, green chillies, chili powder, cumin powder, mustard and turmeric powder.

 

5. Pangasa Fish
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Pangasius is a catfish species which distribution is concentrated in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Myanmar, Malaya-peninsula, Indonesia, Vietnam, Java and Thailand. It is a very popular fish known for its flavor and high amounts of protein and minerals. Its use in the Indian cuisine is mainly in seafood based curries and other common curries such as coconut curry.

 

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References:

https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/kitchen-basics-101-how-to-cook-with-jowar-flour-1213728

http://www.stylecraze.com/articles/amazing-benefits-of-bitter-melonbitter-gourd/#gref

https://ecostalk.com/benefits-karela-bitter-melon/

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-curry-leaves.html

http://www.fernspickles.com/bombayduck%20pickle.html

http://www.fernspickles.com/bombayduck%20pickle.html

https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/pangasius-pangasius-hamilton-1822-a-threatened-fish-of-indiansubcontinent-2155-9546-1000400.php?aid=69345

 

 

 

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